sparkler resolutions

New Year’s Resolutions: To Resolve or Not To Resolve

Being clear about your values, strengths and priorities is the key to creating change, whether you declare New Year’s resolutions or not. Since today likely feels like the real new beginning, as we return to routines after a long winter vacation, or at least a Monday holiday, it’s a good time to put those intentions into action. If you missed crafting resolutions, or already bailed on the ones you made, take heart. You’re not doomed to a year of misery and failure. You got up at a ridiculous hour, dressed in actual clothes instead of lounging in sweats all day, right? Congratulate yourself and trust that you can still create positive change in 2018. To Resolve or Not To Resolve Depending on the top hits, an internet search will report a resolution failure rate near 90%. I know you don’t trust everything you read on the internet, but those outcomes are. . . .

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Going Viral with Emotional Contagion

Going Viral with Emotional Contagion Episode 001: December 8, 2017 Imagine you’re out sailing on a windy day. You can’t see the wind, but you’re definitely aware of its presence and its effect on the waves, the boat, the hair that’s flying in front of your face. Like the wind, you can’t see emotional contagion, either. It’s different, though, because its effects often aren’t apparent at all. ListeniTunes (https://itunes NULL.apple NULL.com/us/podcast/posnav-000-welcome-and-thanks/id1242159404?i=1000396431412&mt=2)Google Play (https://play NULL.google NULL.com/music/m/Dqqv4hhuexnnxkyqh4w557kyzfe?t=PosNavPodcast_001_Going_Viral_with_Emotional_Contagion-Positive_Navigation)SoundCloud (https://soundcloud NULL.com/florence-moyer/posnavpodcast-001-going-viral-with-emotional-contagion) Read It’s flu season in my neck of the woods, so everybody’s hyper-conscious of germs and viruses and anything that could possibly be contagious. Which is inspiring this episode, about a different kind of contagion, one that, like the flu you can prepare for and minimize its effects. Build up your well-being antibodies enough and you could even become a carrier of a different condition, one that actually benefits others. To get started, imagine. . . .

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Welcome and Thanks

Episode 000. December 5, 2017 Imagine you’re at this big conference, in a fancy hotel ballroom, sitting at one of those round tables, listening to a speaker in the front of the room, together with a hundred or so other conference-goers who are sitting at other round tables just like you. . . . Listen iTunes (https://itunes NULL.apple NULL.com/us/podcast/posnav-000-welcome-and-thanks/id1242159404?i=1000396431412&mt=2) Google Play (https://play NULL.google NULL.com/music/m/Dvcbtiyaw2dvegztkme6hmy5aeq?t=000_Welcome_and_Thanks-Positive_Navigation) SoundCloud (https://soundcloud NULL.com/florence-moyer/posnav-000-welcome-and-thanks) Read Imagine you’re at this big conference, in a fancy hotel ballroom, sitting at one of those round tables, listening to a speaker in the front of the room, together with a hundred or so other conference-goers who are sitting at other round tables just like you. The speaker shares a concept, an idea, an opportunity that instantly gets you so fired up, you notice your hands are grasping the bottom of your chair so that you can’t jump up on to the. . . .

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Be The First You

Imagine feeling curious and excited every day. Using your innate strengths and skills with intention. Living in alignment with your values. It’s not like you wave a magic wand and everything comes easily. You have to expend effort to make things happen. It’s just that you do it in a way that energizes you and serves those around you. I want that for you. (For me, too.) Sounds like a bunch of new age-y, coachy-coach, rainbows and unicorns mumbo jumbo, right? I think that sometimes, too. Even though I know to the core of my being that leveraging our innate values and strengths and using our natural skills is the best, most joy-filled means of growing well-being and serving the world, it makes my Inner Skeptic cry out, “you can’t just go around saying that stuff out loud. People will smirk and roll their eyes.” Alma Deutsche just may be the. . . .

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Time for a New Vision

Clearing away what no longer serves you is essential to making space for a vision of what does. That view. Brilliant blue sky. Vast lawn. Unimpeded view of that enormous ancient tree. An hour of sitting with nature in that space renewed my spirit like few other experiences can. It wasn’t until after the requisite post on social media that I realized the view I found so inspiring hadn’t been possible a few days earlier. That stump in the foreground? It’s all that remains of another tree, a magnificent but dying beech that was at high risk of harming people and other trees as it dropped large, dead branches and eventually fell altogether. The sounds of its demise jangled my nerves and hurt my heart, even as my brain knew that everything had been done to save it in a way that would keep neighboring trees and visiting humans safe.. . . .

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Can a Grateful Heart Save Your Life?

Can keeping a gratitude journal prevent you from having a heart attack? Several researchers have discovered a connection between gratitude and heart health and are digging deeper to discern the how and the how much. A significant body of research reveals a link between gratitude and physical health – think connection, not causation. Grateful people, for instance, experience fewer aches and pains and report feeling healthier, according to a 2012 study (https://www NULL.psychologytoday NULL.com/blog/what-mentally-strong-people-dont-do/201504/7-scientifically-proven-benefits-gratitude). They’re also more likely to do health-positive things like exercising and getting regular check-ups. Grateful, Complaining or Random Psychologists Robert Emmons and Michael McCullough looked at the gratitude-health connection by having study (https://www NULL.health NULL.harvard NULL.edu/newsletter_article/in-praise-of-gratitude) participants write a few sentence each week on an assigned topic. Depending on their group, participants reflected on things that happened during the week for which they were grateful, things that irritated them, or things that affected them with no. . . .

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gratitude at work classroom musical instruments

Do You Know More About Gratitude at Work Than a Fifth Grader?

I learned about the power of gratitude at work from a bunch of ten-year-olds. A strange thing happened at the beginning of what became my final year teaching middle school music. The new fifth graders thanked me. After every class. Sincerely and authentically. Thank you for teaching us. Thanks for a fun class. Thank you. Not every kid, every class. Enough, though, to have a significant impact on me during that otherwise difficult school year and on my understanding of the power of gratitude at work ever since. If they were adults, it would have been easier to brush them off. No big deal, just doing my job.  Wanting to set a good example, though, as well as being truly grateful for their positive interactions, it was natural to respond with thanks of my own. Their expressions of gratitude boosted both their positivity and mine. We didn’t waste energy trying. . . .

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begin with thanks gratitude practice

Begin with Thanks

When I was a brand new coach, one of the first things I did was a lead group coaching course on gratitude. Two people signed up. I was thrilled. I taught and coached. They showed up fully and shared with courage and compassion. We learned. We grew. We supported one another in community. We connected deeply, with one another and with ourselves. Each of us transformed gratitude from a nice idea that we said we wanted more of in our lives to a meaningful practice that fed us and fueled us and opened us to make space for more joy in our lives. I loved leading it. They loved being a part of it. A few years later, I put it out into the world again. Three years in a row. No one signed up. Thank goodness. Caught up in the bigger, better, more, more, more mentality that I’ve seen. . . .

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person's hand writing in a notebook

Why You Need a Personal User Manual

Do you have a Personal User Manual? You need one. What? I’m not some piece of IKEA furniture or a kid or pet being left with a sitter. Of course not. You’re a human being who interacts with others in order to accomplish important work in a world of rapid, unpredictable change and uncertainty. Someone who needs clarity to make wise decisions that support what success in the world looks like for you. You Need a Personal User Manual Successful, forward-thinking CEOs write and share their User Manuals with direct reports to help them get up to speed more quickly and effectively. New York Times columnist Adam Bryant writes (https://www NULL.inc NULL.com/the-build-network/to-make-your-management-style-clear-create-a-users-manual NULL.html) about two such CEOs, TravelPod founder Luc Levesque and QuestBack strategist Ivar Kroghrud, who worked with The Build Network to craft a set of seven questions designed to pattern “clear, tactical guidelines for the care and feeding. . . .

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Short-Term Coaching for Big-Time Impact

Is short-term coaching effective? It depends. Maybe you’re ready to invest in short-term coaching to help you figure out what’s next, craft a plan to make it happen, and/or navigate your journey, and of course, you want your efforts and investment to be effective. Call me biased, but my own and my clients’ experience shows that working with a coach is a fantastic way to get clear, make wise decisions, and start creating the kinds of success you want in your life and work. How long will it take? The truth that you probably don’t want to hear: it depends. Conventional wisdom – as if there’s anything conventional about the personal growth and development of a unique human being, like you – is that it takes at least three months to create lasting change. In some cases, that’s true, but – wait for it – it depends. Short-Term Coaching Instead. . . .

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